Classroom Rules and Routines: more charts and posters

After my last post, I snapped a few more photos of charts and posters in my classroom.  Hopefully this will give you a better idea of how I use charts in my classroom to support my students with good choice behaviours. 

I also had a great conversation with my students on Monday last week, regarding behaviour and our classroom.  We had a Discipline Audit happening in the school (an auditor from the Ed Department visits the school to see mountains of paperwork and talk to teachers and students) and I prepped them for a possible conversation with the Auditor.  I asked, “What do we have in our classroom that helps you make good behaviour choices?”  The responses they gave to that question were truly uplifting for me.  They pointed out the posters and recited the rules.  One student said, “Miss H, you are the main thing we have to help us make good choices.  You remind us of the rules and you spend lots of time making charts and posters and putting them up in our classroom.  If you didn’t make the rules clear, we wouldn’t know what to do.”  I have to say, this is my favourite class in a long time.  Sigh.  I will stop rambling and get down to pictorial business.

I use this when teaching and rehearsing our attention getting signal. I ding a bell then point to the sign.

I use this when teaching and rehearsing our attention getting signal. I ding a bell then point to the sign.

The Listening Monster below was in my previous post.  But there is more to it than simply having it beside the board.  I have the “STOP LOOK LISTEN” Sign above my Monster.  When I ring the bell, students know I want them to Stop what they are doing, Look at me and Listen for the next instruction.  It is clear what I expect when they are supposed to be listening – be still, be quiet, pay attention.  Some of my students have difficulty being still, but as long as their fidgeting is quiet and not disruptive, I can cope with movement.  I ask for Monster Listening and point to my little Monster buddy when I need to encourage some students to catch up with the rest of the class.

Establish expectations for listening: what does it mean to "listen"? What does good listening look like and sound like?

Establish expectations for listening: what does it mean to “listen”? What does good listening look like and sound like?

I enjoy doing this task with my students and displaying the finished products in my classroom too.  I draw a Peace Sign on the boardPeace Sign of Principles and in each section we write an Aim High Principle (SWPBS) – Respect, Responsibility, Co-operation.  The last section has a space for Safety.  I lead the class in a discussion about each of the principles/ sections in the Peace Sign. While we talk about Respect, for example,  we write rules that exist so that we show respect for each other such as raising our hands to speak.  I ask questions such as: What does respect look like and sound like?  What words show respect?  What actions are not respectful? The discussion continues as students begin to create their own Peace Signs.  This year I gave my students the option of creating Donut Charts instead of a Peace Sign – instead of writing about each Principle they chose one.  The Behaviour Principle is written in the middle circle and words/ actions go in the outer circle.  Students added colour before displaying them.  Some of my students haven’t finished theirs yet, but they will be done as soon as our assessment is completed!

Here are some images of rules and routines charts that are used in other classrooms.

Making Group Work expectations clear with an acronym that describes how to behave during group time.

Making Group Work expectations clear with an acronym that describes how to behave during group time.

Do you have difficulty keeping your students in check during the last few minutes of class time?  They are so eager to get out the door!  Sometimes we are just as eager to see them leave.  Admit it, you have days like that too.  Kelly has created a Dismissal Checklist for her class and I’m sure that the end of her lessons are far more organised than mine.  One of my teaching partners used this idea for her classroom and found the end of the lesson was much calmer from then on.  Check it out: click on the image to visit Kelly’s blog and see more of her classroom posters and charts.

What to do in the last minute of class time!

What to do in the last minute of class time!

 

Classrooms are busy places!  Rules and Routines are vital to a well-managed learning space.  Charts and Posters are a great tool for establishing routines and reminding students of expectations.  What charts do you use in the classroom that reminds students about routines, rules and results of behaviour choices (positive and negative).

NEXT TIME: Charts and Posters for Supporting Literacy Learning.

mel lit coach signature

Advertisements

One thought on “Classroom Rules and Routines: more charts and posters

  1. Pingback: Differentiation Using Visual Aids | Mel the Literacy Coach

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s